Picture courtesy of Shutterstock

Picture courtesy of Shutterstock

 

In the past I usually thought of typical play as spontaneous – the type of play most commonly associated with children. After reading Dr. Brown’s definition of what play can include however it occurred to me that play actually falls into two main categories, both spontaneous and non-spontaneous.

 

For adults spontaneous play could be laughing and joking with friends, dancing or even singing along to your favorite song on the radio, whilst non-spontaneous play could involve board games, going to a museum or playing a game of tennis.

In reality there is a vast array of activities that constitute adult play, below are just a few of them…

 

Spontaneous

 

  • Singing along to one of your favorite songs
  • Dancing
  • Laughing and joking with friends
  • Listening to music
  • Impromptu shopping
  • Taking a walk

 

Non-Spontaneous

 

  • All sports
  • Board games
  • Creating art
  • Arts and crafts
  • Sewing or knitting
  • Karaoke
  • Bowling
  • Going to the cinema
  • Going to a museum or exhibition
  • Going to a concert
  • Going on holiday

 

Stay tuned – next week we will look at how having a bucket list allows us to prioritize play.

 

What type of play do you engage in most often – spontaneous or non spontaneous? Have you ever considered the impact a lack of play can have? Do you think you should increase the amount of play in your life? Please share your thoughts in the comments below to gain encouragement, insight and support from our community, we’d love to hear from you.

 

Exercises:

 

  1. List some ideas for non spontaneous play that you could engage in.
  2. List things that you have always wanted to do that would constitute play.

 

Further Resources:

 

‘Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination and Invigorates the Soul’ by Stuart Brown and Christopher Vaughan