When it comes to career planning there are two distinct methods, each with their own advantages.

 

You can begin by looking at your expenses (handy if you have a family or dependents to support) and then look at how much you would need to earn as a minimum, researching roles that you love nonetheless but that must meet your financial criteria or you could base your career pursuits on your passions, molding your career by what you love to do most, regardless of finances.

 

Naturally the golden ticket is to mold your career to your passions and then earn tonnes however that is not always possible.

 

When researching your career options it is also a really good idea to draw up a realistic picture by researching what the lowest and highest salaries are and what the average salary works out to in practice too. Another thing to consider is whether you would have a regular income as well (you might work for yourself for instance).

 

The main advantages to working your career planning around your finances is that you will be able to maintain your financial commitments and retain a certain level of security whereas with following your passions may not compensate you as much as you would like or need. Having said this that needn’t mean that you resign yourself to jobs you don’t enjoy – after all this series is all about loving what you do! It simply means that the options open to you are suitable for you financially and by no means rules out finding something that you find rewarding.

 

Naturally following your passions is incredibly exciting and fulfilling. This is the more risky path, especially if your passionate about being creative as such industries are incredibly competitive, however, if you are committed to finding a true vocation in life this may might be the best option.

 

However I would add that a third option is available to you. You can find a career path with your finances in mind, finding something rewarding and then pursue your passion or purpose outside of your nine to five until it is financially viable to do it full time. This is what I do and I have to say that although it takes up a huge amount of my time I do feel very fortunate to be able to both satisfy my financial needs in a rewarding job whilst also pursuing my creative passion.

Do financial commitments dictate that you plan your career with your salary in mind? Do you think you will pursue your passions or do it alongside your nine to five until you can do it full time? Are you finding the career planning process exciting so far? Please share your thoughts in the comments below to gain encouragement, insight and support from our community, we’d love to hear from you.