exercise

Finding Balance In Action: Exercise twice a week this week

When I exercise I naturally have more energy and motivation. Indeed it was when I was exercising regularly that I started this blog. I have to admit, I lapsed in my exercise regime for some time, so I will be doing this exercise right with you! Try to commit to exercising twice a week this week – it could be for just a thirty minute walk – and see if you feel better as a result. Do you have more energy and mental stamina for example?

 

This could be as simple as taking a half an hour walk or doing a twenty minute exercise DVD.

 

For more of an in-depth look into a healthier lifestyle please read my article titled ‘New Year, New You’.

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Wars of the Mind; How to Effectively Overcome Anxiety Part Three

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

 

Last week we looked at the thinking traps that can lead us astray and contribute towards our anxiety. This week we explore the healthy lifestyle changes we can make which serve to reduce our anxiety.

 

Lifestyle Choices to Reduce the Effects of Anxiety

 

Offer your anxiety understanding

 

The first critical step to counteract your anxiety is somewhat counter intuitive and comes from teachings in self-compassion. Surprisingly, in order to overcome anxiety and ‘win the war’ you must first accept its presence in your life and recognize it is your minds way of trying to protect you against a perceived threat or coming to any type of harm. Once you appreciate this you can have a greater level of compassion and understanding towards your anxiety rather than resisting it which often only causes your symptoms to increase. Remember, in psychology, what you resist, persists!

 

Exercise

 

Like most things, anxiety is profoundly affected by exercise. Just five minutes of continuous exercise has been found to reduce the effects of anxiety, so just think what half an hour could do. If you are averse to high impact exercise psychologist studies have found that a ten minute walk could be as effective as a forty-five minute workout and relieve symptoms for up to several hours. Furthermore, if you exercise regularly the effects of anxiety can reduce long term. To explore how to incorporate exercise into your life on a regular basis please read my article titled ‘New Year, New You’.

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New Year, New Life – How to Exercise Your Way to Well Being; Part Two

 

Picture courtesy of www.shetaxi.com

Picture courtesy of www.shetaxi.com

One of the main excuses I used in the past was that I simply did not have the time to exercise. In reality most of us lead hectic lives with busy schedules and even with the best of intensions we struggle to find time to exercise. If you find you can’t find the time to exercise try fitting it in to your daily routine by walking or running part or even all of the way to work. Another great strategy is to buy an exercise DVD that can fit into your schedule. Although DVD’s require you to have more motivation because you are in the comforts of our own home, you can help keep your motivation high by placing it in your diary and treating the entry as a deadline. It is helpful to then set an alarm to remind you when to begin your work out.

 

Thankfully, there are many forms of exercise. Whilst running may not be for you there are many other options.

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New Year, New Life – How to Exercise Your Way to Well Being; Part One

Picture courtesy of www.shetaxi.com

Picture courtesy of www.shetaxi.com

According to national statistics compiled by the Health and Social Care Information Centre around one in five British men and woman were obese in 2011. These figures rose sharply since 1993 and, if history is to be believed, are set to continue to rise.

 

Although we all know that exercising is good, for most of us it stays low on our list of priorities. Often we have the intention to tackle exercise once our to do lists have been taken care of – an impossible task considering they are constantly being added to.

 

The truth is that our inactive lives can lead to many health problems, both physically and mentally. Coronary heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure and poor mental health can all result from being inactive.

 

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