practicing patience

Why Patience Pays (and how to get more of it) Part Three

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

 

Last week we explored the psychological impact of losing patience and its consequences. This week we explore the psychological impact of having more patience and examine how we can begin to cultivate more.

 

The psychological impact of having more patience

 

When we have more patience we are more calm, less anxious and generally happier and more content. Whilst there are many psychological benefits to being more patient, I have explored the main benefits below.

 

Improved relationships

 

When we are more patient our relationships flourish. Rather than being irritable we are accommodating and calm. There is much less potential for conflict and our relationships are more harmonious as a result.

 

Realistic expectations of yourself and others

 

When we are more patient we have more realistic expectations of ourselves and others, helping to combat perfectionistic tendencies and thinking.

 

For example, if I always carry out others requests of me straight away because I am a perfectionist, practicing patience will help me realize that I work differently to others and that this is not necessarily better or worse – just different. Likewise, I may begin to realize that my perfectionism and self-imposed expectations are unrealistic and perhaps even unhealthy.

 

Increased self-esteem

More

Why Patience Pays (and how to get more of it) Part Two

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

 

Last week we looked at the intimate relationship between patience and anger, the symptoms of impatience and finding your triggers. This week we explore the psychological impact of losing patience and its consequences.

 

The psychological impact of losing patience and its consequences

 

When we lose patience we invariably suffer with the difficult and uncomfortable emotions of frustration, stress and anger. Indeed, with so many negative emotions associated with a lack of patience, it’s surprising we don’t prioritize overcoming impatience more.

 

In reality though, I think the impatience evident in those who are actively working to overcome it is a testimony to how challenging cultivating more patience can be. I also believe that all too often we resign ourselves to having to be a slave to our emotions but fear not – this needn’t be the case!

 

Frustration

More

Why Patience Pays (and how to get more of it) Part One

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

 

When I was growing up I was incredibly impatient. Minutes seemed like hours and hours like years. Into my teens and early twenties I shunned patience in favor of instant gratification. Therapy forced me to be patient; patient with unraveling the years of trauma that had accumulated and patient with my recovery.

 

In this series I will explore what patience really is, how it can benefit us and reveal ten ways to foster more patience, some which I plan to do as a result of the research I conducted for this article and others which have been highly successful in my cultivating more patience thus far.

 

The intimate relationship between patience and anger

 

Naturally, when we lose patience we get angry, which inevitably affects our relationships and all round quality of life. To avoid getting to the stage where you become irritable and even angry as a result of impatience, stay tuned, as later in the series we will be covering how to actively cultivate more patience.

 

Interestingly however, no matter what the cause of our anger, cultivating patience when we are experiencing anger has a drastically positive effect on our relationships and emotional well being.

 

Practicing patience when angry…

More